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It’s quicker to write a SOP (Standard Operating Procedure) than sort out the ensuing mess of not having one.

Recently, a friend who is almost at the end of a long-term contract, inadvertently passed on the contact details of a business professional that had been given freely to him with no instruction on their use, in order to help a person with a serious problem.

An aggressive phone call was made by the recipient of the details to the mobile number of the professional, who was baffled and felt somewhat unsafe until he managed to extract enough information from the aggressor to enable him to track down who gave out his information.

A phone call to the workplace of the informant alerted management to the fact that one of their staff had transgressed, albeit inadvertently.

When the informant became aware of the issue, he immediately phoned the professional to apologise and after some discussion about what had happened, he was assured that there was no further angst felt.

It did alert him to the fact that the company for which he had been working for almost two years, had no SOPs, aside from the two that he had written relating to work that he had done and only he knew the process.

The CEO was on leave for a month when this drama occurred.

Needless to say, after the damage control phone calls had been made to all parties, he proceeded to write a SOP that covered this particular scenario, as it was one that will occur over and over in this industry.

We should never be too busy to write SOPs! They may save an enormous amount of unproductive time, not to mention the emotional stress caused to all parties.

After that piece of ‘light’ reading, I trust your day goes more smoothly than that of my friend about whom you’ve just read.

Gail Ruth Miller

Author / Speaker / Workshop Facilitator